Authentic Achievements with Special Guest Joe Templin

Authentic Achievements with Special Guest Joe Templin

From Bestselling author, currently writing the forthcoming book Authentic Achievements – The 7 Secrets to Building Brave Belief, Unstoppable Sales, and Turning Your Leaders Into Talent Magnets for Guaranteed Sustainable Growth, this show shares advice, stories and inspiration to help you achieve exponential growth personally and for your business. Featuring interviews with industry leaders and a separate series on #confidencehacker to help you build authentic confidence.  

In this episode, I am delighted to be joined by Joe Templin has led an eclectic life. As one of six kids (the only normal one, he insists) growing up in a small town and spending time on the family farm, Joe’s parents (John and Barb) instilled a love of learning, the outdoors, and a healthy disrespect for authority while still simultaneously embracing traditional values of hard work and “love thy neighbour but mind your own dang business.”

This is Joe’s foundation. He was severely asthmatic but through his work ethic and love of challenge has become a martial artist and ultradistance runner. He had a speech impediment but has built a career around communicating. This habit of overcoming limitations is a theme in his life and his writings.

Joe has three hooligans (Danny, Liam, and Colin) and is a very proud member of the Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, having served multiple times as President of his local Foundation and Chapter Advisor. He has also served on the local, State, and National levels for NAIFA, is a Cubmaster (worst one ever if you ask his boys), and is involved with his local Autism Society. Serving others is important to Joe, because of how his parents raised him.

If you want to find out more check us out at www.authenticachievements.co.uk

If you enjoyed it, please check out our YouTube or our recent blog or subscribe to our Mastermindset Newsletter

Full Transcript Authentic Achievements with special guest Joe Templin

Authentic Achievements Joe Templin

Kim-Adele

00:00:05

Hello, and welcome to this episode of authentic achievements where it’s my absolute delight to be joined by the fabulous Joe Templin, who is an author and a human Kaisen, which I just love. And can’t wait to start to get into a little bit more detail. So Joe welcome

Joe

00:00:22

Kim-Adele It’s great to be back with you again.

Kim-Adele

00:00:26

Oh, absolutely. I so enjoyed our last chat on USA global TV. I was like, we’re gonna have to continue it. Cause we only scratched the surface and we didn’t really get into what is a human Kaiser. I have to ask cause I’ve been fascinated. So

Joe

00:00:39

Kaisen is the Japanese concept of continuous improvement. And in the 1970s, when Toyota first was coming to the us shores, there was the big three automotive, you know, out of Detroit. And Toyota sucked quite frankly. I mean their cars had crappy quality. They were shotty, you know, they were considered low value, but Toyota had a mindset and it wasn’t just a mindset. It was actually a principle that was spread across the entire organization of improvement. So anybody on the assembly line could stop the assembly line at any time, if there was an issue and they would come and they would repair it immediately or they would improve it. And it had a little bit more of a dispersed management structure than the very hierarchical one that was typical in US companies. And so frontline workers could make suggestions to improve the process, the product and all this.

Joe

00:01:44

And what happened is it created these very short feedback loops where every single month, essentially the cars were slightly better and slightly better and slightly better. And very quickly they caught up with the US manufacturers and then surpassed them. And so by the time you got into the 1980s, they were absolutely dominating the market because their stuff was so good and was from this attitude and process and culture of continuous improvement. And so that became a really big management thing in the nineties, early two thousands, where everybody was trying to have continuous improvement and we applied it within the business world. But why is it not being applied in our homes and into ourselves?

Kim-Adele

00:02:30

I, I love that cause you you’re right. It did. It became very big. Didn’t it in, in the eighties and I was in the corporate space. So I am a qualified lean practitioner. So they took us all through the lean process, which is the one you’ve so beautifully described, but we’ve only ever applied it to systems, to processes, to infrastructure, but not to people. And that’s, that’s why I’ve been so fascinated cause it makes such sense. Doesn’t it? That ongoing feedback, those little moments that I think Tony Robbins calls it, the two millimeter shift, isn’t it, you know, when’s going wrong. We think we’re gonna have to do a massive change. But the reality is that we probably just need to do a tiny little Polish, right? What we do

Joe

00:03:15

And James calls this book atomic habits, because it is so tiny, some of the changes that you make, but if you compound them over time, which is the reason for the cool nonlinear growth curve on the front of the book is just a little bit better. Just a little bit better, just a little bit better in some way, if you improve 1% for the week, not even the day for the week at the end of two years, you’re almost three times as good.

Kim-Adele

00:03:44

Wow.

Joe

00:03:44

But people don’t wanna do the little continuous things

Kim-Adele

00:03:48

We want that we want the quick window we want the want the big

Joe

00:03:53

Or the surgery or, you know, wave the magic wand. And all of a sudden the unicorns are showing up with cupcakes and bags of money.

Kim-Adele

00:04:02

Oh don’t, don’t ruin my dream. Joe thinking I’ll go to sleep and I’ll wake like younger and richer. And, but no it’s true. We do, we do have that. We have that want don’t we to do the quick one. And yet the reality is our success comes in the things that we do continually. And if we can keep improving the things that we do continually, then we that’s where we get our exponential growth. Isn’t it?

Joe

00:04:28

Yes. And just look at it. For example, I went to my 15 year old’s high school. He’s a freshman orchestra concert a couple months ago and I compare where they are now at 15 to where they were a couple of years ago when it sounded like they were torturing cats. And it’s just because he practices for, you know, 15 to 20 minutes a day, most days and has his lessons. But it’s that compounding whether you’re trying to learn a language or martial art or to build your communication skills or your relationships. I mean everybody in the current, you know, dating world and Tinder and all this stuff, you know, swipe, swipe, swipe, oh, they’re perfect. Boom. And I’m gonna have a perfect relationship. No, it takes time to build relationships. It takes time to build intimacy on something beyond just a physical level. And if you take the time to do it properly and really invest and you have those difficult discussions that everybody wants to avoid, you can create something that is much better and sustainable and lasting. And if you’ve done right, you can make it. So that is much more interesting and has multiple components to it. And this is whether it’s a work relationship, a friendship or a actual, you know, romantic relationship. But everybody just wants to swipe, swipe, swipe and make it easy.

Kim-Adele

00:06:00

Yeah. We have, we have made the, the world like two instant in the gratification. Haven’t we, I, I was doing a speech actually earlier this week and said, in my opinion, there’s a three letter word that changes the world and you can like, oh my God, three letters is going amazing. And I was like, the word’s just yet, you know, when we start telling ourselves that we’re not good at something I’m a little girl will come home and she go, mommy, I’m not very good at colouring. I’m like, you’re not good at colouring yet. Yes. But look how good you were today versus last week, last month, last year, you

Joe

00:06:30

Know, and that’s actually got some tremendous psychological impact because it is taking the 80 plus per cent of the power of the brain, the subconscious and putting it to work as to how to figure out how to solve that problem.

Kim-Adele

00:06:45

Yeah. And that’s why for me, it’s the life changing word. And I say to her every day, let’s redo that sentence. Let’s put in yet, because it’s not that you are bad at this. It’s that you’re not good at it yet. It’s that you’ve not learned it yet. But when we do that, it’s, it’s kind of unlocking that subconscious and yeah, I do quite,

Joe

00:07:02

And you’re really you’re reprogramming her particular activation system. So you’re changing her software and the filter that she looks at the world through. And so that’s going to carry over into all sorts of other arenas, not just colouring, but also tying her shoes and attempting math and doing sports and all these other things. And so that’s giving her a very good basis for which she’s going to build almost everything off of. So having that, not yet attitude is important. And then learning that it’s going to take work and being able to accept and actually love the grind to build something significant. I mean, there’s an old stoic saying that the person who has never had to work for something is unfulfilled. I mean, if we literally had the unicorn just showing up and giving you stuff, you’d turn into a spoiled princess as opposed being able to work and appreciate not just what you have, but the other people around you and it humanizes you. I mean the individual who spent six, seven years in the minor leagues before making it to the big leagues and succeeding, they appreciate it much more than the person who’s just unnaturally gifted and shows on up on day one.

Kim-Adele

00:08:23

That’s so true because actually I think as well, if you shouldn’t have been handed everything on a plate, the bit that you don’t value is yourself. Cause you dunno what part you brought to it cause you didn’t bring anything to it. It just came to you. Yeah,

Joe

00:08:34

You didn’t didn’t earn it.

Kim-Adele

00:08:36

That’s it. Whereas we, you know, we learned the most, I always think, you know, I guess looking back at life, I now realize that everything is a lesson, a blessing or both. So if in the moment I don’t feel blessed. I look for the lesson cause it’s probably there. And then in the future I look back and feel blessed that I was given the lesson because it helped me become who I am. It helped me to know, to say to my little girl to just add in the word yet. I wouldn’t have known that if I’d not made so many mistakes in the 30 odd years prior, you know, trying to navigate that for my, for myself. So I think you’ve, you’ve got to, you do get grateful, but only if you take the time to be grateful, isn’t it to take that moment and reflect. And instead of looking on where I’m going, look at where I am and where I’ve come from, right? Because that’s where you, that’s where you get the motivation to keep going. Isn’t it. And I say to clients all the time, you

Joe

00:09:29

Know, I’ve, I’ve always survived in the past. I’ve got a hundred per cent track record of getting through bad days. I can keep going. I can get through this, whatever this happens to be.

Kim-Adele

00:09:40

Absolutely. But it’s giving us that time. Isn’t it? Cause I think we, I think sometimes we focus in the wrong space and you know, as you so eloquently put our subconscious brain has got 80 plus percent of the power and it’s yeah. I always say it’s the happiest little help you ever have, but it comes with one very significant floor. It doesn’t know whether or not it’s helping or harming. So whatever you tell it, it it’s important. So if you tell it that you are rubbish at something, it will find you all the evidence that you are rubbish at something. If you tell it, you want to be good at something, it will find all the opportunities to help you be good at it. So you’ve got to use the right language, haven’t you? So it can actually yeah. Be helping you, not actually supporting your self sabotage.

Joe

01:10:26

And the average person has somewhere between 50 and 80,000 thoughts per day. And most of ’em probably 60 to 70% are somewhat routine. And most of ’em are also negative. So if we can change just a little bit of that thought process by setting up the environment a little bit better, or as you said, adding the word yet, these little things, those tiny changes are, are enough to change the direction of the battleship essentially. And if you, all it takes is a, that little bit of improvement each day, it’s negligible. It’s, you know, essentially not even noticeable, but it is over time. You can see it. I mean the grand canyon took millions and millions of years to get carved on out and you don’t notice what the river’s doing, but over time it will cut through stone and it will be able to carve these tremendous things. That is the same way that our thought processes are. And we get stuck in these processes. So sometimes you gotta sweep out, but they can literally achieve things over an extended period of time that people are just dumbfounded by.

Kim-Adele

01:11:45

Yeah. What is, I mean, you, you know, for yourself when you’ve, you’ve been, you know, you start off and you dunno how to do something and then if you just keep at it because you know, it’s important to you or you’re passionate about it, you keep going. And then all of a sudden the impossible becomes possible. You know, I always say

Joe

01:12:01

Become,

Kim-Adele

01:12:04

I, the very word says, I’m possible you just have to split it in a different space.

Joe

01:12:12

And it, if it, if somebody else has done it before, you can probably do it. The, I, I’m not sure who said that, but if somebody else has been able to sit there and in poverty, be able to write some of the greatest fantasy novels of the past 50 years, JK growling, you know what, why can’t I, why, you know, she did it while on the do, why can’t I, you know, sit there and write every single day for 15, 20 minutes, I’ve seen people turn into spectacular martial artists over a 10, 15 year period. And what how’d they do it while they started by going to their first class, you know, I’ve seen people become, you know, guitar virtuosos, and how did they start by picking up a guitar and sucking at the beginning. But they did it every single day and compounded over time, had that success.

Joe

01:13:14

So it is the consistent effort is one of the most important components to having authentic achievements. Because as Stephen King says, a professional shows up and writes every single day. So there’s gonna be days when you don’t feel like doing it. I mean, yesterday morning I did not wanna get up and work out, but I did it. The one secrets of success is having no goose eggs showing up and doing the job even when you don’t want to. And when you can do that, it builds your intestinal fortitude. It builds your character. It builds your moral strength so that when you want to not do other things down the road that are bigger and even more important, you still have the mindset of I’m just gonna do it. You show up and take care of it. And this is one of the things that as parent we were talking about you, sometimes we don’t wanna do it, but we do it because this little person is dependent upon us.

Joe

01:14:13

So my friend who’s a special needs. Parent. Her son had rare for pediatric cancer. It’s like, I have no choice in her. I just have to do it. And so when it comes to work related things, she’s like, I just do it. And she’s incredibly successful at what she does because she just does it. So building these habits, these attitudes, these disciplines in some areas of our lives are things that we can then carry over into other things. And one of the things that you’ll see when you look at really high achievers is that they have these cross-functional capabilities like discipline, like creativity, like strong communication skills that help them in multiple arenas of their lives.

Kim-Adele

01:15:02

I love that’s so true. It’s in that consistency. And the other thing that you talked about slightly earlier was kind of always the power of belief, you know, with somebody else has done it, then you can do it. I think that was proven wasn’t it by Roger Banton and everyone thought that the four minute mile was impossible. And yet within the month of him actually successfully beating the four minute mile, I think there was something like 23 people went on to beat it within the first month because the disbelief was now. Yeah.

Joe

01:15:32

That’s oh, you see high school kids doing it all the time now. And it’s like, wow. So, you know, it used to be building a billion dollar company or, you know, writing a best seller or putting together a successful podcast. I mean, once there is a track record from it, what was incredibly unusual now becomes almost commonplace.

Kim-Adele

01:16:02

It’s true. And I think the, but yeah, for me, one of the biggest lessons I learned because it’s becoming a mum, was the power of belief because I looked it and see you look at these little people, don’t you amazing little people, all the world, all the world’s over. And you think if, if you were to turn around tomorrow and say, when you wake up, you’ve got to learn how to walk or talk or run or jump or skip, we’d be overwhelmed. We’d all be overwhelmed. That’s, that’s a terrifying thing. And yet at our most vulnerable, we learn to do it. So you start looking at well, why is that? Why is it when you’re so tiny that you’ve got the courage to be able to do that? And I, I think it comes down to, in my opinion, three things, but things that we could learn for our future, which is we wanna fit in.

Kim-Adele

01:16:43

If you can do it, I want to do it. Cause I just wanna be like you, I don’t really know how to say no and mean it, you know, even a toddler tantrum runs out of steam eventually, even if at the time it doesn’t feel like it’s ever gonna stop. But the third and perhaps really the most important is I’ve yet to see a child learning, to walk that doesn’t have at least one person thereby going, come on, you’ve got this. You’re so close. So we quite simply lend them, our belief. We, we give them our belief and let them cling to it. And wouldn’t it be an amazing thing if we did that as adults, if we shared our belief in other people, if we proactively, instead of just saying, can you do this job for me saying, can you do this job for me? Because I believe you’ve got the great creative skills for,

Joe

01:17:26

I know you can do this.

Kim-Adele

01:17:28

Yes.

Joe

01:17:28

But, and there’s one other component to that is that, you know, kids all have a growth mindset. Their a sponge is they explore. They wanna learn. They don’t understand the power of no. Other than, you know, parents telling them, no, you can’t do this. But you know, they, they have no boundaries in terms of what they believe is possible. And so it’s that combination of having this just unbridled belief and enthusiasm and optimism, but also having the big person being there, supporting them, saying, you can do this, you’ve got this. So that is the critical combination for success in almost anything. If somebody’s trying to build a business, they have their own personal belief system that they can do this. And they’ve got the vision. What they need is they need somebody on the outside, whether it is a best friend or a spouse or a mentor saying, you got this, you can do this. You know? Yeah. I understand. It’s tough day. Yeah. You fell down your butt. 10 times kid, come on, get up. You can do this. And so having that almost cheerleader is one of the things that helps unlock the potential in a lot of ways. And so professionally I do that with a bunch of my coaching clients and I’ve actually had to go on out and assemble people around myself that remind me, yeah, you, you, you can do this dude.

Kim-Adele

01:19:00

Yeah, it’s true. Isn’t it? You know, we, we, we can do it for others, but we have to, you have to get people that can do that for you. You know, brain surgeons can’t do their own brain surgery for a very good reason. We can’t, we can’t, you know, we can’t operate on ourselves. So I think one of the things I learned very similar to you, you know, I surround myself with, with the right support coaches and mentors as well, because I recognize I can’t do it for myself because you find yourself. I D if you find yourself doing this as well, you’ll be, you’ll be helping a client. You’ll be giving them the advice. Now in the back of my head, I’m like, good advice. You’ve not taken it. Cause I really I’m giving it out, but I’m not doing it myself. But

Joe

01:19:39

It’s like, oh, maybe I should do that too. Yeah.

Kim-Adele

01:19:43

I know this works. Why am I not doing it? But we all have those moments. Don’t we, where we are blind to our own blind spots. They’re blind spots for a reason. We

Joe

01:19:52

Can’t say, well, there’s an old Irish saying a good friend is the best mirror there is. Or as Robin Williams said, you know, a real friend will listen to your bullshit, tell you that it’s bullshit. Call you out on it and then keep listening to you.

Kim-Adele

02:20:08

Yeah, I it’s. It’s true. Isn’t it? You know, I, I always say one of my roles in life is to be the critical best friend and the person that’s gonna let you know, you bum looks in it before you leave the house. Not when you’ve tried around town thinking, you look amazing.

Joe

02:20:22

A real friend will tell you that because they want the absolute best for you. I’ve got a friend who, who she’s like, you know, I just want people to like, make it easy for me. I don’t want any pushback I want. And I’m like, you, that’s not a friend. That’s an enabler. You, you basically, you know, with, no, you don’t want criticism. You don’t want somebody to challenge you and bring out your best. You want somebody to just make you feel good all the time. That is an addict mentality. You’re just basically saying that you’re drunk. And you want somebody to always drive you to the bar and pay for your drinks as opposed to saying, no, dude, don’t do that. And yeah, this is one of influences. And this comes about to talking about excellence or achievement because champions wanna be coached and coached hard people who don’t wanna be pushed that way.

Joe

02:21:12

Aren’t going to become the best version of themselves. And so they’re gonna have regret over time. They’re gonna pull other people down mentally and emotionally and potentially even physically and financially. But the people who say, show me my flaws, tell me why I can do better. You know, I was having dinner with a friend the other night. I’m like, I’m screwing up. And you know, I think I’m screwing up like this and this. And she’s like, well, actually you’re screwing up like this. And this is some of the things that you should do. And so a good friend, a good mentor is going to tell you that not because they wanna hurt you, but because they wanna help you, but it’s just like lifting the weight. And you know, it hurts lifting the heavier weight. You have to tear the muscles a little bit to grow bigger and stronger. It’s like if you’re tiger woods that you basically redid his golf swing to make it even better. So it’s being able to go through that painful self discovery very often guided by somebody else who cares about you and take a step back so that you can take multiple steps forward.

Kim-Adele

02:22:19

I love that. It’s so true is next. If we think about most of the things that, that propel us forward, they have to come back first. They have to come like, you know, if you’ve gotta pull it back for it to be able to move forward. So I always try and remind myself of that analogy when I’m thinking about sometimes I have to take that step back to be able to, to do that that forward and to be able to be the best version of myself, because I think that’s our yard stick in life. You know, I always out try every day to be a better me than yesterday. Cause if I can achieve that, then eventually I’ll be a really good me. Hopefully. Yeah.

Joe

02:22:54

I say I’m a practicing Catholic practicing cause I’m I still don’t have it. Right. I’m trying to get better. And it’s a non-linear thing. It is not a straight line. I mean there’s some days where you step back and then eventually move forward. So it’s not this nice, easy, straight line. It’s more like the flight of a butterfly, but gravitating towards success.

Kim-Adele

02:23:21

That is so true. And it’s, I guess it’s being comfortable with that. Isn’t it? That actually, you know, when we, it’s not, you know, we make mistakes, we’re human. We’re, we’re fallible. Not perfect. We’re not supposed to be perfect, but I, I don’t think it’s the mistake that defines us. It’s what we do with the mistake. It’s it’s whether we or not, we acknowledge it, apologize and learn from it or ignore it and hope it goes away or deny it and pretend it didn’t happen.

Joe

02:23:47

Well, it’s like trauma too, because we all have traumas. We all have, you know, major, bad things that happen to us. And it’s like, do we have post traumatic stress from it? And we get bunker mentality and negative from it or do we get some broski says post-traumatic growth. And we use it as fuel, you know, Michael Jordan getting cut from his high school team. He used that as fuel to become great. In fact, when he was initiated to the basketball hall of fame, he invited the guy, he lost his spot on the high school team to it, cause it was still a chip on his shoulder. Now that’s an extreme example, but you know, we’re probably not gonna become Michael Jordan, but do you take the bad thing and let it harm you and hurt you and hold you back? Or are you gonna take it and use it to force you to grow into something better than what you were?

Kim-Adele

02:24:41

I love that reminds me, I dunno, whose quote it is, but it reminds me of the quote that when you get, why me swap it for try me. So actually instead of being the victim of it, go, okay, show me on. Like we see how far I can get. And I guess that’s the thing. If we can find the thing that motivates us to keep going to keep moving through, you know? And I think sometimes that can be inside of us and sometimes it can be outside of us. I know in some of my most traumatic experiences like your friend or my daughter isn’t isn’t doesn’t have any illnesses. She was my greatest strength because she needed me. She was a baby. So it was like, I don’t get to break down. I don’t get to give up and go and crawl under a do phone. Feel sorry for myself. Cause she’s one, she needs be things she needs looking after she nurturing. So actually just focusing on her, helped me get through the, until all of a sudden you looked back and was like, oh look months have gone. I’m still here. I’m still living still. You

Joe

02:25:45

Become strong because you have no better choice. And then after the fact you realize how strong you were and became, and then you can take that and apply it in a new way. And so Malcolm Gladwell talks about this. He calls him desired difficulties. So you look at like the owner of the met Steve Cohen had dyslexia as a kid. He still has it. And so it, he had to learn a different way of learning and applying stuff and that it gave him an advantage later on, was building his career as a trader. So if you have a disadvantage that you have to work harder for and you can turn it into a unique, special capability. Another example that I use around that is Bruce Lee. Everybody loves Bruce Lee movies and they love, you know, all the cool kicks. They was doing everything. Bruce Lee had one leg that was slightly shorter than the other one,

Kim-Adele

02:26:45

Really.

Joe

02:26:46

And so instead of this being a hindrance, he turned it into an advantage and became because of the slight difference. He was naturally talented at spending kicks in the he with the thousands and tens of thousands of hours of practice. He became Bruce Lee and that became one of his signature moves because of it. Tony I from black Sabbath, Tony Naomi lost the tip of his fingers, an industrial accident in the early 1970s. So he couldn’t play the guitar the normal way. So what did he do? They tuned it down by like a half an octave to reduce the pressure. And that ended up creating that signature deep black Sabbath sound. Whoa. Okay. So these are examples of people taking what could be considered a catastrophe and completely turning AI on its head.

Kim-Adele

02:27:51

I, I love that. One of the things I I talk about is turning your vulnerability into your superpower. Cause very often our thing we’re vulnerable about is the thing that we, that makes us great. You know, I spent years worrying in corporate life that they would find out that I was an ex hairdresser and I didn’t have the degree or the qualifications or the right to my job. And yet I now realize that was my greatest gift of leadership because as a hairdresser that they teach you to listen to what the person really wants to help them to achieve it and to let them leave feeling the best version of themselves. Well that’s leadership. That’s

Joe

02:28:28

You know what the internships in psychology and sales are hair dressing and bartending.

Kim-Adele

02:28:36

Yeah. Yeah. So

Joe

02:28:40

Listen, you learn to bring out the inner beauty in the other individual, which is ultimately what leadership is about leadership is about being the black velvet under the other people’s diamonds and laying them shine. And so that’s what a great hairdresser does. One of my closest friends is a hairdresser and like she doesn’t have a lot to work with me, unfortunately, but I mean, we talk about how she can like see the transformations in people over a couple of times, working with them in terms of bringing out their personality, bringing out their bubbliness in some ways, you know, making them more confident. And if you can then continue to bring that to fruition in terms of what you do for work, what you’re doing in terms of relationships, what you’re doing in other arena, that is exactly what we’re trying to do from a leadership point of view or me as an author in terms of my focus on out people’s excellence. It’s all different ways of doing it. As they say, many roads lead to the mountaintop.

Kim-Adele

02:29:49

I love that. I love the whole analogy about being the velvet underneath somebody else’s diamond. What a beautifully eloquent way of putting it, because that is what leaders are there for to hold others up and let them shine. That they’re light brightly. Joe, it’s been an absolute delight. I could chat to you all day. Hopefully we get to do it again. If you come back on looking

Joe

03:30:10

Forward to that,

Kim-Adele

03:30:12

Which would be amazing, but in the interim, how can people get in touch with you to learn more about you and what you are doing?

Joe

03:30:19

So they, it can follow me on Twitter or Facebook. Those are both at EDE with Joe, so they can just DM me and interact with me there. Or if they go to the website every day, dash excellence.com that’s everyday-excellence.com. I put up new blog posts every day, these podcasts going up there, there’s Twitter, feed all these other things and they can reach out to me directly through there.

Kim-Adele

03:30:44

Amazing. I will make sure all of the links to that are in the notes below for anybody that is listening or watching. I hope you’ve found it as insightful as I did, Joe. It’s been an absolute joy until next time. Thank you.

Joe

03:30:57

Kim-adele thank you. Be excellent. And grow today.

Kim-Adele

03:31:02

You take care.

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