Authentic Achievements Episode 10 with Special Guest Rahim Gulamali

Authentic Achievements Episode 10 with Special Guest Rahim Gulamali

Authentic Achievements Episode 10 with Special Guest Rahim Gulamali

In this episode, I am delighted to be joined by friend and colleague Rahim Gulamali,

Rahim is Co-founder DnA Global Community, Boardroom Advisor, Startup Business Mentor (Strategy, Transformation, Business transformation and M&A), Cornerman, Community Builder, Podcast Host and Global Connector

As a trusted advisor, he supports Sr. Leaders and Executives to achieve SUSTAINABLE HIGH PERFORMANCE, empower people, and transform approaches to achieve sustainable growth. Through a combination of Coaching, Consulting, and Connecting (cohorts) he enables “Co-Creation” opportunities and enables you and your business towards future success!

Learn more about Rahim and DNA Associates at https://www.duchainassociates.com/

Find out more about Ikigai

If you enjoyed the show please like subscribe and share our YouTube or see our other blog

#ikigai #connections #authenticachievements

Full Transcript:

Authentic Achievements with special Guest Rahim Gulamali

Kim-Adele

Hi, and welcome to this episode of authentic achievements where it’s my absolute pleasure to be joined by my friend and colleague Rahim Gulamali from Duchain and associates he’s co-founder of DNA global community boardroom advisor, startup business mentor in strategy transformation, M&A a Cornerman community builder podcast host, and a global connector. As a trusted advisor, he supports senior leaders and executives to achieve sustainable high performance in power people and transform approaches to achieve sustainable growth through a combination of coaching consulting, and connecting cohorts, he enables co-creation opportunities and enables you and your business towards future success for him. It’s an absolute joy to have you on here. And I know from having worked with you personally for the last couple of years, just what impact you have on the organizations that you work with and in the community that you’re building with DNA. So thank you so much for coming along and sharing with us a bit about your journey.

Rahim

Well, the pleasures, all mine, and again, yeah. We know each other for quite a long time working together. So it’s amazing to contribute to your podcast show and happy to contribute of course.

Kim-Adele

Oh, bless you. You are such a joy. So to start off with what would be great is if you could share with us a little bit about your journey to date, you know, how did you get here? There’s been so many exciting things that I know, but perhaps,

Rahim

Well look, if you, if you look at the journey, I think the journey starts when you are young, when you’re a kid, have your parents taking care of you and my parents had to work really hard. And it, it goes back to their youth that they had nothing. So when they, when we were growing up, our parents wanted to give us everything. They did everything to give us everything. When you grow up, you get a bit of a vibe for your parents. And everyone who tells, tells me, I am not gonna be like my father or my mom. Well, forget about it. You are your father. You are your mom, you are your family. Nothing’s gonna change about that. So if I look at my journey and I’m gonna look at my, basically my career journey, I’ve done a lot of things. I worked several years in finance, seven years in sales, seven years in customer experience.

Rahim

And the last five years, ish, I’m working in transformation change, boardroom advisory. One thing I learned a few years ago, actually, just before I met you, Kim, is that we tend to live a dream. We want to live a dream. And some people tell, right, you lived a dream. You’ve been all over the place. You’ve traveled. The world. Been in planes, been in airports, being in beautiful restaurants, being beautiful cities. The thing is that, yes, if you do a lot of business travel and you have teams across the globe, there are a few things. What, what are happening. If you look at the teams you work with, you cannot lead teams across the globe. If you are a micromanager. So I’ve never been one. I never had the opportunity. Not because I didn’t want to, but actually I could not taking then the living the best living your dream living, the dream is actually something like my parents were working hard.

Rahim

I said, I don’t wanna be like my mom and dad working 24, 7 early money. I did the same thing. That’s why I ended up in international jobs. That why I was traveling. That’s why I was making a career. And everybody said to me, oh, you are so incredibly successful. But the question is, was I 21 years of corporate life, 21 years of traveling 21 years of a, the ability to deliver anything you throw at me, that’s resilience, but am I living my best life? So if you ask me, how did you come? Where you came? I think it was a life changing decision to actually make a choice and actually investigate what life actually meant to me. And I’m not saying living the dream, I think we’re gonna talk more about that. Living your best life versus living the dream.

Kim-Adele

Oh, it lived it. cause I think it’s right. Isn’t it. Sometimes people look outside in and go, oh, you’ve got all these things. I remember somebody telling me years ago when, when I used to travel a lot. So it was such a glamorous lifestyles, nothing glamorous about having the,

Kim-Adele

That actually goes with what you wanted. But I guess it was, you know, that, that perception because you traveled a lot, you went and delivered those things. But, but you’re right at what compromise, you know, you look, remember having this debate with a friend many years ago, who was like, it was right for you two you’re really successful. And I said, but it’s about choice. We’ve given up, having time at home. We’ve given up being able to, you know, spend more time with friends and family because you go to work on Sunday and you come home on Friday night, if you are looking. So it’s been a compromise. And to your point, does that mean we’re living our best life? And I know for me what, when I have my little girl, that was a massive turning point for me, cuz I suddenly realized I’d waited, you know, 43 years to have this little person. And I wanted to make sure that I, I grasped every minute of it and I, and I didn’t miss out on what is such an amazing experience. And that’s what made me take my change from corporate life to, to running my own business. But I know you’ve made some amazing leaps haven’t you in, in how go and live your best life. And I’d love to hear

Rahim

Yeah, yeah.

Kim-Adele

Why you’ve done it.

Rahim

So we’re talking about yeah. So you mentioned perception. The perception is what people will see from the outside. The perception is the expectation from everyone around you to become what they couldn’t become or become what they think you can become that whole ambition around what, what the, what success means. That perspective. It’s almost interesting when I talk to people, I coach and them. Okay. What is your biggest success? Well, I built a business and I did that and I grew my team and I sold my business and I’m rich, you know? Okay. Is that your biggest success? You know what? My biggest success was the day my son was born the day I had a little boy in my hand and I figured out, oh my God, what the F are you doing? You’re never at home. Huh? You’re you’re living the dream.

Rahim

And I live an extraordinary dream well not extraordinary. For the people. If you look me up, you’ll see, I’ve been a DJ. I make music. I do my work. I travel everywhere. So it, it can be that people see it’s a dream, but it was too much. It just was too much. I’m gonna be honest. It took me 10 years, 10 years before I actually did something about it because the vomity was born. I was in love. And, and I had that. I, I need to change stuff. But Monday morning when I was back on the flights, it was back, back to business. So I think it was around 40. And I was thinking, okay, is this it?

Rahim

I stopped my job. And they rehired me to do a transformation program. And again, two years was whereby 42. Still didn’t do anything about it. And then I said, look, this cannot continue like this. I need to find out what my, my, what is my vocation? What do I really love to do? And I figured out that, looking at the beginning of my, my introduction, seven years of finance, seven years of sales, seven years of customer experience, I have a seven year itch. Why do I have that? I like to do new stuff. I like to jump in the deep and do new stuff. When I already have done it, did it done it dust, it it’s out door. We learned from the past, but we create our own future, but I wasn’t creating my own future. So I had to take a little bit of a step back. I looked at my profession, am I doing what I like? Cause you always start with there. Huh? The first concern you all always have when you wanna change your life is do I have the money to pay for it?

Rahim

I actually figured out is that if I change my life like I wanna live it. I need to think about how much money do I need to be able to do that instead of how much money do I, can I get more? It isn’t about more, less can be more. If you look at my, like now I run a lot less. Maybe not true now. But last few years it was a lot less. And I had to give in, in a lot of things I had at that beautiful car in front, the door, that beautiful house, buying a television whenever I could, if I saw a new car and it was there, ah, bought it. Everything was consumed because you have the money and you don’t have anything behind that to give you a fulfilling life. And a lot of, of you, people are living that life. Yeah. When you go to network events or when they are sober, they try to sell you something. Then in the evening we go for a drink. Then they get drunk and they start talking about what they all have. But actually what they’re telling you is what they don’t have. They don’t have a life.

Rahim

So taking that back profession. Great. I know what I’m good at. Now. I need to figure out what are the elements I like to do? Cause that will, re-engineer how I am thinking about my future. But I also had to look at my passion. What I’m passionate about. I’m passionate about music, but can I be a DJ dress of my life? No way people, the youngsters will even like me on the stage. Who’s that old guy playing the music.

Kim-Adele

You’ll be retro.

Rahim

I’ll be retro. Okay. It comes back. It’s a new fashion. You get a new fashion later. I also have to look at, what do I love? And then I figured out, wait a minute. If I change my role, if I change my future, I not only have to look at me cause you hear a lot of, I, I have to look at we what’s happening around me. What’s happening in the community. Can I do something with my skills, with my talent to help others? Cause look, honestly, I don’t believe doing good is, is standing in a kitchen, cooking for people who don’t don’t have a home. I think it’s good that people do that. We need people to do that, but it’s a waste of my skills. Not that have a good cook actually, but besides that, it would be a waste of my skills.

Rahim

So I looked at what I love. I look at what I’m being paid for. I look at what I’m good at. I look at what, what things people around me and I said, wait a minute, there’s a model in there. I thought I had something new. It was actually not new. We, I talked to a couple friend of us, Tiago Nuez and he introduced him to Ikigai and I said, ah, that’s it. So I started deep diving in that, into that model. And it’s all around finding who you are, what you enjoy, where you wanna be. And what’s really important. And when you are self employed, you tend to pick up everything. You can, you wanna be everywhere. Fear of missing out the FOMO. Yeah. But actually the trick is purposely missing out on things. Yeah. But applying focus towards your objectives and goal. So if you ask me, what’s your legacy in life.

Rahim

If you asked me two years ago, I wanna have enough money on the bank account. So when my son grows up, he has a house, he has all the stuff and then he can build a future of that. Not my mission in life. He needs to be able to do that for himself. My mission in life is that he figures out what his ambitions are and what he loves, et cetera. Like I had to do myself. So if you look at the world of Ikigai and what brought me here was I’m good at coaching. I like coaching. Not because I like coaching. I hate coaching, but I like helping people. I’m a people’s guy. So when I work with executives, it’s not getting a, oh, here’s a, let’s talk about the model and how and complete that. I never do that because I believe that everyone is different and everyone needs a different type of mentor.

Rahim

Coach. I call myself a Cornerman. That’s a bit more because I’m there 24 7 for you. And not as a mentor, I will not coach you in one specific thing, but I will challenge the hell out of you, cuz I wanna make sure that if you run a beautiful business, you’re a beautiful person too. You cannot run a beautiful business. If you’re not a beautiful person, you cannot run a beautiful business. If you don’t have the energy, the dynamic, the love, the vibe to get it done. You can run a business. You even if you cannot do anything, I’m a, I’m a predominantly, I’m an example of that. I cannot do anything. I didn’t study. I didn’t do anything. I learned everything as I went. And of course I have an MBA. And of course I did that all later, but I never started off with that.

Rahim

I started off with jumping in a deep, experiencing making my mistake. People telling me you’re awkward. Why did you do that? But I took that as a positive feedback. And that brought me where I’m now. So what happens? You’re saying long story, here he goes, eh, eh, drum rolls. Well, the drum roll actually is that I found what I wanted to achieve in life. And that means I mentor startups. We just recently in the program where we are helping women in Africa start their own business. We mentor them in the business model. We mentor them in the, go to markets. They’re branding, et cetera, et cetera. We don’t get any pay for that, but we do get paid for that because we get some love. We share some love. We are giving, getting people with our experience to grow and to Excel. Yeah. So that’s one thing I think like that we can do what the world needs, right.

Rahim

To help. Then if you look at work wise, yeah. You have to do something, but have to also to pay the bills. And it was a bit of a struggle. Do I go back to corporate? Easygoing was I got a big network or do I try to use everything I learned and then learn a bit more to be able to help those guys? Cause if I look at my old colleagues, they’re stressed, they’re stressed like a, they’re working 80 hours a week, half of the time, they’re even productive. They’re not sporting, they’re drinking. They’re getting fat. I got a bit fatter, but that’s logical. When you live in Spain, as you wake up with a beer, that’s normal.

Rahim

But I just keep my body, my mind, and my soul in the right level, in the right mode, I do my walking meetings on the beach. So if you look up my LinkedIn, you probably will see something where I’m in my shorts, on the beach with a nice shirt on and a phone doing do a standup meeting. That’s for me is life. It doesn’t have to be your life by the way. But for me, it being outside, being in nature, being under the elements, being with other people and listening, listening to their life stories, helping them out, not by telling them, by asking them questions at that natural curiosity. And that became slowly over the last few years. Now it’s my business. I connect people. If people need a connection business wise, if people need support, I have a massive network and I’m utilizing that network because the brand and the network is really important to grow yourself, grow your community and learn fast.

Rahim

If I don’t know the answer, I’m not gonna tell you the answer. I will call Kim or someone else, cause they’re better at certain areas. So when you in use the power of the network, you can grow exponentially yourself, but also grow the people around you. Again, back to my vocation, I’m turning a bit around things, but if you ultimately look from living the dream in a corporate life in playing automobiles, taxis, karaoke bars, I’ve seen a lot of them. If you ask me, if you ask me Tokyo, how was it? I know the airport.

Rahim

I know a taxi driver and I’ve been a karaoke bar. Just as an example, I haven’t seen anything. If you look at the last two or three years, I’ve spoken to hundreds of people. I’m coaching a lot of people currently I’m getting my assignments through the network. Speaking positively of have a chat to Rahim he’s not selling, but he’s there to contribute. And to help you grow in the four pillars that we have. And I know I’m good at that, but not because I have been trained to be good at that is because I want to be able to help others. And when you put that first, the rest flows together as well.

Kim-Adele

I love that. So true it reminds me that you know I love a good quote. It reminds me of the Pablo Picasso one, which is ‘The meaning of life is to find your gift. The purpose of life is to give it away’. And I think, you know, it took me a long time to, to find that which was, you know, the meaning in life for me is to leave things better than I found them. And to leave every situation with a feeling of increase as a result of that, interaction. And I think once you, get to that, the rest becomes so much easier. Doesn’t it? One of the things I chat to, people about where I think we’re are very aligned. It’s like, you know, I think at our base, people want to be listened to understood and respected. And if you can create that space for them, listen to really understand more questions, to understand better harness, that passionate curiosity, they uncover the answer for themselves cause the answer’s in them.

Kim-Adele

It’s not, it’s not in us. It’s just about those, right questions and what an, you know, what an amazing way of, of kind of creating a living. And I think you talked about FOMO. I think it’s how we help people move FOMO to JOMO. So how do we turn the fear of missing out into the joy of missing out? Because actually you’re not being stuck, doing something you don’t want to do and you are instead doing something that makes your soul sing. Because if we were all doing stuff that made our soul sing, imagine amazing place that we would be in. So, many things already you’ve already mentioned, obviously one of your proudest achievements is the birth of your son, but what else would be, what was perhaps your biggest achievement from a work point of view? And that doesn’t necessarily mean say a specific project. It can be being able to take people on the journey, being able to kind of create communities and culture, which I know are vastly important to you as well.

Rahim

So I wanna tell you one story from a negative and a positive perspective. Yeah.

Kim-Adele

Yeah.

Rahim

If you look at my job, as a change or a change lead within organizations, I tend to come into projects, which I need reinvigoration because they fail. Yeah. Many technical projects where they forgot to think about the business change. I come into projects where organizations are, let’s say almost dying, bad leadership, bad finances, bad choices to reinvigorate them. If I look at the, the proudest achievements, it’s linked to also the, the sometimes horrible job I have to do within organizations, firing people, getting people to change jobs, getting people to get a, get a new future. Well, I’ve never fired people without giving something back, helping them restart our lives. Cause it may be that you’re not suitable for one company that does not mean you’re suitable for others. It may not be that you are not in line or the right person to work in the company because you are just different.

Rahim

But there are other companies who need someone like you. And if you look at all those transformations I’m known for oh damn Rahim’s in. And I had it in the past when it was for corporates, oh Rahim oh my God, something is going to happen. Why is he in our office? And generally often there was nothing, but sometime there was something what I needed to change or update, et cetera. If I look back every time when I had to re-engineer an organization after six months, I got thank you notes from the people who were impacted by the reorganization because I didn’t do it just from, from a financial standpoint, when I help organizations change, I help the people within the organization change. That’s my objective change is a people business. That technology part is just a tool. It’s just a change of process, change of working.

Rahim

But that mindset is something which is change you. So if you look at business wise, my most important achieve has also my drive when I do change, is that when I leave the company, everyone impacted or not impacted comes to me and say, you did a hell of a job. Thank you for what you’ve done. You have protected us. You have helped us grow. You have helped us evolve. Even, even that wasn’t your task. Cause your task was cut cost X for instance, and still you have done that. And as long as I can keep doing that, not stick to certain processes. Cause a lot of the companies I work for sometimes because through consultancy agencies and they give me a methods, this is the method we want you to use. And I technically go, okay, I will follow the steps, but let me just do it.

Rahim

Like Lewis Hamilton says in the car, when he is raising guys, shut up, let me just do it and get it done. And that’s the same thing. So my most proud achievements on are. And I got a few of them where people had to leave the organization. They were the, the organization saw them as the bad people. They could be blockers. They could be whatever. It’s generally a fear or a fight action. And then those people come to me. Rahim, thank you so much. How you did this. You really took care of us. I found a new job or I found a new job within the company or outside the company. I found my new vocation. You helped me figure out where I’m good at and what type of organizations fit with be. So I don’t have to go and apply to, to any organization, but I can focus on specific organizations and those kind of things make me proud. Not the fact that I hit the target. Generally I aim to hit the target, but that’s not what makes me proud on the project. It makes me proud when people come back to me and tell me you did a good job.

Kim-Adele

Yeah, no, I, I, I totally agree. I think, you know, some of the hardest things we have to do is when we do have to let people go or we do have to run redundancy and in transformational change, that happens all of the time. But being able to do it with respect and to ensure that people are left aged as a result of what’s going on is, is something to be proud of. And actually it’s something that I think more organizations should understand. I’ve always thought it was very shortsighted organizations when they downsize expect to grow. If not, they’d close. So why would you have a bad downsizing? Why would you be disrespectful of the people? Cause that’s not just gonna impact the people that you let go. It impacts your standing in the community. It impacts your standing in the industry. So when you do grow, your ability to attract talent is impacted as well. So it’s, it’s always struck me. It’s very shortsighted, but sadly you, are right. There’s very few people that take the people on the journey to deliver the results. So you should definitely be very proud of that. What

Rahim

Would you say? Well, if you look at the numbers, if you look purely at the numbers in transformation, we know that 92, 93% of the transformations fail, they feel drastically. And if you take the advantage, the, the example of, of, of shifting work and changing the policies, we tend as executive level just to look at the numbers. That means if we do that, we don’t need so many people. If you do that, we don’t have to spend those costs. But if you really look at the general process, for instance, changing a product to replace four other products, does that result to less people?

Rahim

Actually, it doesn’t, it results into more people because you get extra work. You’re not decommissioning product products. It takes you two years before you can change them. So in that time you need more people. So every process within the organization has a lever. If we do that, then we can save money on that perspective. Yeah. But what happens with the cost on the other side of the business? Yeah. And those levers of change are both emotional and personal, but also financial and that’s, what’s often forgotten. So when you have that few end to end and it’s more of talking about my job, you will see that a change does not always result in, in cost cutting on the short term. It may on the longer term, a change should also not be focused on the cost. Cut, cutting, but should be focused on making the business ready for the future.

Kim-Adele

Yeah.

Rahim

Those are two different things. Cost cutting is easy. Making the business ready for the future to grow is something else. And I think I, I, I learned one thing from you, Kim, we talked two years ago when we did the project together, we talked about this topic yeah. Around how to help organizations grow. But I think that one is for another session. Yes.

Kim-Adele

Back on it. But, but you’re right. It’s get, you know, it’s getting people not to think about what do I need right now? It’s what do I need next? What do I need for the future? Guess you make probably very different decisions and we’ll definitely get back on and chat about that going cause you, and I know we can day. So what would you say has been the greatest lesson you’ve learned so far?

Rahim

The greatest lesson I learned in my whole career is that your brand is everything. And it sounds a bit weird, right? If you think I’m a leader within the company, I’m here to be, leave my team. And if I do well and I hit the numbers, I’m doing a good job, but that’s not true. I learned it the hard way I did a hell of a job. I worked really hard, always successful, et cetera, et cetera. But I got the brand of someone who’s there to fire people. And when I started the engagement, I delivered the numbers, the equity was happy. We had the right numbers, the right bit, everything was sorted. But at the end I was not successful because my brand was broken. I took the heat for other people because I was interned. So yeah. Then you take the heat for other people so they can, can continue, but don’t get your brand.

Rahim

Everything people don’t buy, you have done people buy who you are. So if you think that your successes in the past are a foundation on the future, if your brand is not right, people don’t acknowledge that you are a true person. People don’t acknowledge that you are a person who’s there and caring for them. You can try and do anything you want, but you will never progress in your career. So one thing I think is really important for everyone to understand is brand awareness. If your brand gets broken, if you have a negative brand perception is reality. The numbers are not important. Perception is reality. If you think you’re doing right, but other people don’t, that means their perception is reality and change. Their perception is, is complicated. Huh? So perception is reality. I think I need to change the brand perception is reality.

Kim-Adele

I love that. It reminds me, I, I often say to people, perception like possession is nine tens of the law. If you perceive it to be true, it’s true. So unless I do something to change, it’s going to remain true. And I think, you know, I talk to lots of people who go, well, I don’t need a brand, cuz I’m a leader. It’s like you have one. We all have one. The difference is whether or not we own it. Cause our brand is what people say about us when we’re not in the room. And so whatever we think it’s there, it’s the case of owning that and being, being accountable for it. Isn’t it being responsible for the impact that we have on other people. So great advice. And, and you’re right. I think it, you know, my last guest on that show, we were chatting about this, which said, when we all started out, you were told, not show any vulnerability.

Kim-Adele

And that to be a leader was almost to be stoic. And you were gonna, you were gonna come and obvious that doesn’t work. Cuz people are people and people want to connect with people. And actually once you learn to be human and authentic and share vulnerability without losing credibility, it all becomes so much easier because then you in it together and you can grow together. You’re still there. Aren’t you to have their back. I love that whole piece. That is again, bound to remind me of a quote. You said reputation will get you in the room. Character will keep you there. Exactly. That that’s kind of true, isn’t it? We’ve got, we’ve gotta bring our whole selves to the situation and that be a little bit scary. But once you step out there and do it, it’s amazing. The gift that, that, that brings for you in opportunities. I’m

Rahim

Think that I think for all of people, they’re, they’re afraid of that, that failure because they’re afraid of failing. They, they tend to put an image of them out there. What they think is expected, expected and respected. I think about 20 years ago, if you had a tattoo and you were going for an application, don’t show them your tattoo. Well guys, I’ve got multiple tattoos. And when I go to an application or to a customer, I don’t care if they see it or not. But the perception changed over the years. Now it’s normal, right? There’s almost no one on the street here without a tattoo in Spain. So if you don’t have a tattoo, you’re actually not normal, but that’s, that’s the truth. So, so things change. We tend to want to show other people what they want to see in us. But when you are your authentic self and also for me, I took time, man, because I was the go getter. And I forgot about everything. I didn’t care about anything. And someone said a Rahim. You’re such a beautiful person, but why are you doing like that? You’re showing us someone else and you really are.

Rahim

And I woke up, I said, wait a minute. That’s not me, but how can I be me? And if you don’t figure out and look it up, icky guy, there are nice templates for the that. But if you don’t find out what your Ikigai is, you cannot be your best self and your authentic self. And that’s the thing. The key message we should give everyone because we get, we, we become 40 and it tells we have a midlife crisis, some by a Porsche, some do something else, whatever. But’s a midlife crisis. Now that’s the moment we start rethinking, Hey, we are, we are midway our, our lives. How do we wanna live the remain of our lives? And it takes time. I wish that people were 20, 21, 22 years old, get this at school. They should get this at school. And you guys gonna change.

Rahim

If I would’ve done this when I was 20, probably my whole career, would’ve been different. Maybe I would’ve been laying in a nice beach in Thailand with beautiful Thai kits and beautiful Thai food and living the dream and running a restaurant QP. But I would’ve had another life because I knew where my passion was. Yeah. And over the years that will change. I look at my Ikigai every month. I got it here on the wall. I just look at it going, is that still what I want? Okay. What I’m doing now is this contributing to what I want to and if it doesn’t, I just don’t do it. Even though I love to do it, I will not do it because there’s 24 hours in a day, eight of them will wanna spend with my son. Eight of them will wanna be sleeping. And eight of them, I’m gonna do fun stuff, which is my work by the way, work like

Kim-Adele

Of what was gonna be my last question, which is what would be the advice you’d give to your younger self. And, and you just summed it up so beautifully, which is to go and find what your Ikigai is to really understand what it is and to live your life with purpose and intention, to deliver what it is that you are that you’re looking to. Assuming I’ve summarized that appropriately.

Rahim

You just summarized it perfectly. And I like the purpose and intention live an intentional life. Yes. I don’t live a passive life. I don’t think that that only drinking beers with your friends on the beach, which is lovely to do. And I still do that. I’m 47 years old. I’m probably gonna do that until I die, but there’s more in life. And when you have the right intentions, when you have the right view on what makes you happy and not only you think about your, your, your misses or your boyfriends or whatever, people around you, everyone has a purpose in life. And when you find that you’ll find people in place you’ve, wouldn’t even know you wouldn’t even expect. If you’re a corporate guy and you work on senior level, you tend to work with people off that level. I can tell you the best conversations I ever had were people I’ve met on my travel, who were travelers, wearing their shorts, their caps, the backpack. And they were telling me about their, and I really enjoyed that, but I never went back to that life. But now I’m incorporating that into how I live my life. I like to take that backpack and go into the mountains. We like to go on adventure and we try to build our work life, everything around the things we love. So again, back to intention is really important. Purpose is really important and just find the love for the great things out there. That’s more than just the cocoon you’re living in.

Kim-Adele

I love that. It reminds me, my Nan always used to say every day is a school day. So we should open our minds and we should look to learn something from everybody that we meet. And my granddad used to say live each day as if it is your last and one day, you’ll be right. And I now try and live my life between the two, try and learn something every day. And don’t put off till tomorrow, something that you could do today, cause it’s not promised. And I think it is. It’s being passionately curious about life. Isn’t it exactly saying? What, what, what can I learn? You know, I learned so much from my little girl and from her little friends and their unique view on the world. And you’re like, I wonder, wonder why we stop like that. So Rahi, it’s been an absolute joy. So how can people get in touch with, with you?

Rahim

That’s quite easy. Go to LinkedIn. You’ll find my profile. There are not many, Raimes try to write it correctly. It’s on the screen. So use that there you’ll find all my information. Also my contact information. If you wanna have a chat or your, your interest in learning more or just a brainstorm or maybe you wanna share something for fun, I’m also open to have a chat, just visit my LinkedIn, connect with me, open up to connections. And if I can help you connect you to others, I’m happy to do so.

Kim-Adele

Oh, brilliant Rahim. It’s been a joy as always. I will make sure all of your links are in the show notes. So it makes it really easy for people to get in touch with you. I look forward to next time and thank you again for sharing such with.

3 thoughts on “Authentic Achievements Episode 10 with Special Guest Rahim Gulamali”

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